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On-call

If you’ve ever worked a job that requires you to be on-call, you know that it can take a toll on your body and brain.  You know that it restricts what activities can you do, limit the places you can go, mess with your sleeping pattern, and worst of all, stick that thought of being called-in to the back of your head.

And the more frequent you get called in, the more your mind is thinking about your job: prepare for surgery, respond to a gunshot scene, fight a fire. (Essentially, taking the mind further and further away from the present.) But unlike many of these very important jobs, the majority of our population today is on-call to something else.

Check Twitter. Post to Instagram. Read a Facebook notification. Keep a Snapchat streak. Tweet. See who liked your Insta post. Check Facebook. Snap a picture. Chat with a random person on Tinder. Repeat.

Initially, it may seem like it doesn’t require a lot of effort just to move your thumb up and down a phone screen a couple hundred times. However, attempting to focus on more than one thing at a time or spractically switching back and forth between tasks can drain your energy levels and, of course, decrease your ability to perform a single task.

What are you on-call to?

(Next week, I’ll explain how taking care of chickens and goats taught me how to take one call at a time.)

 

 

 

 

 

The Dropout Squad View All

Dropped Out. Now I'm Here.

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